How to Help

If you're like us, your digital life is one big, fast news feed. Some of this news is messed up. How to Help works in the news cycle to connect you with ways to do something about the day's big stories.

Nothing Unusual Here

Nothing Unusual Here

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has entered the building.

Day one tasks:  Adjust ergonomic chair. Locate stapler. Set up meeting with 1000 staff about their dissent cable.

Some of his employees aren't too happy about the Muslim ban.

But official dissent is normal, right? "There's nothing unusual about the entire national security bureaucracy of the United States feeling like their commander in chief is a threat to US national security," said former Assistant Secretary of State Tom Malinowski. "That happens all the time. It's totally usual. Nothing to worry about."

Former Assistant Secretary of State Thomas Countryman was unceremoniously relieved of his 35 year tenure last week. In farewell remarks, he urged staff to stay and protect the nation against all enemies, "foreign and domestic" (wink wink).

How to help dissenting State Department employees

With characteristic regard for the people who have devoted their careers to public service, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said: "These careers bureaucrats have a problem with it? They should get with the program or they can go."

Sign the petition on the White House website urging State Department staff dissent to be considered by Secretary Tillerson (and share it on Facebook, Twitter, or wherever you hang out)

Send "these career bureaucrats" a copy of "The Nervous Civil Servant's Guide to Defying an Illegal Order".  

BTW, the article's author has offered pro-bono representation "for any government official who refuses to execute a Trump order on the grounds that the order is illegal."

Bad Trip

Bad Trip

One Vote to Go

One Vote to Go