How to Help

If you're like us, your digital life is one big, fast news feed. Some of this news is messed up. How to Help works in the news cycle to connect you with ways to do something about the day's big stories.

The Story of DC's Missing Girls

The Story of DC's Missing Girls

Last week's story of missing Black and Latina girls in Washington DC sparked national concern and an important discussion of race in news coverage.

While the number of kids who have gone missing this year is egregiously high (500+), it turns out there wasn't actually a big spike.

Instead, Washington DC's leadership began publicizing missing children cases more proactively via social media.

But the confusion around the story presents a big opportunity: asking why so many kids go missing in the first place.

Often, missing children are running away from unsafe homes. While some are at risk of trafficking, many others are forced into vulnerable situations to secure housing.

How to help children facing risks stemming from homelessness

Join the National Coalition for the Homeless's National Campaign for Youth Shelter. According to the campaign, with over 500,000 young people experiencing homelessness but only 4,000 available youth shelter beds, "the majority of homeless youth [are forced] to struggle for survival on the streets". 

Support Washington DC nonprofits working to protect youth in crisis, including the Sasha Bruce YouthworkWanda Alston FoundationLatin American Youth Center, and Covenant House Washington.

Also, if you're in Washington DC, join the National Day of Action for Housing this Sat. April 1 at 9am. The event will protest the Trump Administration's threat to cut housing and homelessness services, some of which are the only source of protection for endangered children.

(*Thanks Jessica Raven for these tips!)

Shot Clock

Shot Clock

Water Wars

Water Wars